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Stephens' Kangaroo Rat Habitat Conservation Plan

 

Appendix C

HCP-Related Policies in the General Plans of RCHCA Member Agencies

  1. A. General Plan Requirements
  2. B. HCP-Related General Plan and Community Plan Elements of the RCHCA Members
    1. 1. County of Riverside
      1. a. Lake Skinner-Domenigoni Valley Core Reserve
      2. b. San Jacinto-Lake Perris Core Reserve
      3. c. Lake Mathews-Estelle Mountains Core Reserve
      4. d. Sycamore Canyon-March Air Force Base Core Reserve
      5. e. Motte Rimrock Core Reserve
    2. 2. City of Corona
      1. a. Conservation Element
    3. 3. City of Hemet
      1. a. Resource Management Element
    4. 4. City of Lake Elsinore
      1. a. Open Space Element
    5. 5. City of Moreno Valley
      1. a. Conservation Element
    6. 6. City of Murrieta
      1. a. Conservation/Open Space Element
    7. 7. City of Perris
      1. a. Land Use Element
      2. b. Conservation/Open space/Recreation Element
    8. 8. City of Riverside
      1. a. Conservation Element
    9. 9. City of Temecula
      1. a. Land Use Element
      2. b. Open Space and Conservation Element
  3. C. References

This appendix provides an overview of the HCP-related policies and relevant goals, objectives, and programs stated in the General Plans and Community Plans of RCHCA member agencies.

A. General Plan Requirements

The State Government Code requires each city and county in California to prepare and adopt "a comprehensive, long-term general plan for the physical development of the city or county." The General Plan must contain seven elements (land use, circulation, housing, conservation, open space, noise and public safety) and may contain other elements important to the physical development of the community (e.g., parks and recreation, public services and facilities, scenic highways and historic preservation). Habitat conservation is incorporated into the Government Code requirement in connection with three of the mandatory General Plan elements:

  • As part of the conservation element, which provides for the conservation, development, and utilization of natural resources including water and its hydraulic force, forests, soil, rivers and other waters, harbors, fisheries, wildlife, minerals, and other natural resources;"
  • As part of the open space element, which in part provides for "the preservation of natural resources including but not limited to, areas required for the preservation of plant and animal life, including habitat for fish and wildlife species;" and
  • Indirectly, as part of the land use element, which must designate the proposed general distribution and general location and extent of the uses of the land for housing, business, industry, open space (including agriculture), natural resources, recreation, education, public buildings and grounds, solid and liquid waste disposal facilities, and other categories of public and private uses of land." C-1

B. HCP-Related General Plan and Community Plan Elements of the RCHCA Members

The adopted General Plans and Community Plans of the RCHCA members are consistent with the provisions of the Government Code; they address habitat conservation primarily under one or more of these three mandatory plan elements or a combination of elements. Taken together, these General Plans address a broad spectrum of habitat conservation-related policies, including:

  • sensitive species protection;
  • habitat inventory/mapping;
  • habitat acquisition;
  • development review/control;
  • site specific biological assessment;
  • wildlife buffers/corridors;
  • mitigation/monitoring, and;
  • multi-species planning.

All nine General Plans and pertinent Community Plans address the issue of sensitive species protection through the planning process, which provides the basic framework for habitat conservation. As a means of ensuring wildlife protection, six General Plans also specify the creation of buffer zones around sensitive habitats and the preservation of wildlife movement corridors.

Since planning is intended to produce orderly and appropriate development, the majority of General Plans also focus on policies related to the development process. Eight of the nine General Plans require further site specific biological assessment when warranted by proposed development impacts or an inadequate habitat data base, and six require appropriate mitigation measures and subsequent monitoring for new development.

Habitat acquisition (five plans), habitat inventory/mapping (three plans) and multi species planning (four plans) are also recognized by RCHCA members as important policies for implementing habitat conservation.

The most relevant of the policies stated in one or more elements of each RCHCA member's General Plan are presented below, along with a summary list of goals, policies, and programs included in each member agency plan (Table B-1).

1. County of Riverside

Unincorporated lands within the jurisdiction of the County of Riverside encompass almost 70% of the 533,954 acres covered by this HCP. Accordingly, policies adopted by the County are of particular importance to this document.

The Riverside County Comprehensive General Plan is the primary statement of goals and policies for implementing the development and conservation programs of the County of Riverside. The Community Plans, developed as subsets of the General Plan, are intended to provide additional land use goals and policies that address the unique concerns and needs existing within the Community Plan area. In so doing they are intended to facilitate the implementation of Comprehensive Genera! Plan policies and programs.

The core reserves defined in Chapter 5. SKR Conservation and Mitigation Measures are contained within the boundaries of the following Community Plans: SKR Core Reserve LS-DV SJ-LP LM-EM MRR SC-MAFB Applicable Community Plans Southwest Area Community Plan Lakeview/Nuevo Community Plan Lake Mathews Community Plan No Applicable Community Plan No Applicable Community Plan

a. Lake Skinner-Domenigoni Valley Core Reserve

A portion of the Lake Skinner-Domenigoni Valley core reserve is located within the Southwest Area Community Plan (SWAP), adopted by the Riverside County Board of Supervisors on November 28, 1989. The SWAP covers an area generally bordered to the south by the San Diego County line, to the west by the Cleveland National Forest, to the north by Keller Road, and to the east by the boundary of the Riverside Extended Mountain Area Plan. This area includes those portions of the core reserve in the vicinity of Lake Skinner.

The SWAP includes the following HCP related goals concerning open space planning for important natural resources:

  • Retention of open space land containing important natural resources such as scenic beauty, sensitive vegetation, wildlife habitat, and historic or pre-historic sites;
  • Preservation of the open space characteristics of the SWAP area, including Lake Skinner, Vail Lake, and the mountains, through the careful control of public services, facilities, utilities and other capital improvements;
  • Preservation of agricultural lands and their associated uses;
  • Support for policies and programs which implement the concept of extending urbanization contiguously from established urban centers, rather than allowing scattered development which infringes upon open space. C-4
b. San Jacinto-Lake Perris Core Reserve

The southeast portion of the San Jacinto-Lake Perris core reserve is located within the Lakeview/Nuevo Community Plan (LNCP), adopted by the Riverside County Board of Supervisors on December 18, 1990. The LNCP area lies to the east of the City of Perris, south of Lake Perris, west of the cities of San Jacinto and Hemet, and north of the communities of Homeland and Romoland.

The LNCP includes the following HCP related goals concerning open space planning for important natural resources:

  • Retention of open space land containing important natural resource such as scenic beauty, sensitive vegetation, wildlife habitat, and historic or pre-historic sites;
  • Preservation of the open space characteristics of the LNCP area, including the San Jacinto River and the Lakeview Mountains through the careful control of public services, facilities, utilities and other capital improvements;
  • Support for policies and programs which implement the concept of extending urbanization contiguously from established urban centers, rather than allowing scattered development which infringes upon open space.
c. Lake Mathews-Estelle Mountains Core Reserve

A majority of the Lake Mathews-Estelle Mountains Core Reserve is located within the Lake Mathews Community Plan (LMCP), adopted by the Riverside County Board of Supervisors on December 22, 1987. The LMCP covers approximately 42,386 acres south of the City of Riverside; this area is within the City's sphere of influence.

The LNCP includes the following HCP related goals concerning open space planning for important natural resources:

  • Retention of open space land containing important natural resources such as scenic beauty, sensitive vegetation, wildlife habitat, and historic or pre-historic sites;
  • Preservation of the open space characteristics and the LMCP area, including Lake Mathews and the mountains, through the careful control of public services, facilities, utilities, and other capital improvements;
  • The protection and preservation of wildlife.
d. Sycamore Canyon-March Air Force Base Core Reserve

Only a small percentage of the Sycamore Canyon core reserve is within the jurisdiction of the County of Riverside. Since there is no applicable Community Plan in this area, any proposed projects within the County's jurisdiction are evaluated for consistency with the General Plan and zoning ordinances on a case-by-case basis.

e. Motte Rimrock Core Reserve

The majority of the Motte Rimrock core reserve owned by the University of California, an entity of the State. Accordingly, the University of California acts as the lead agency when processing "projects" within the NEPA and/or CEQA process. Under the NEPA and/or CEQA process, the County acts as a commenting entity. For those lands within the County's jurisdiction no applicable Community Plan exists. Proposed projects are evaluated for consistency with the General Plan and zoning on a case-by-case basis. Both the County and the University of California exchange information on proposed projects within the vicinity of the Motte Rimrock core reserve.

2. City of Corona

The City of Corona General Plan adopted in 1992 includes nine elements, including: land use; circulation; housing; conservation; open space; parks and recreation; community design and scenic highways; noise; seismic safety and public safety. Policies contained in the conservation element of the General Plan provide a basis for implementing habitat conservation within the City.

a. Conservation Element
  • Conservation goal: To create a productive balance between man and his uses of land and the conservation of areas with unique environmental and aesthetic value.
  • Conservation objective: To identify and preserve lands of significant value as natural resources.
  • Conservation program: Implement policies that will: 1) conserve the unique aspects of the City's resource base, and; 2) minimize the disruption caused by the interface between development and the resource base.

3. City of Hemet

Elements of the General Plan adopted by the Hemet City Council in 1992 include: community development; economic development; public services and facilities; transportation; public health and safety; resource management and housing. The resource management element addresses habitat conservation through a biological resources goal and discussion of related issues, strategies, and programs.

a. Resource Management Element

The Resource Management element includes the following goal and strategies related to this HCP:

  • Biological resources goal: The management of rare, endangered, and candidate species and their habitats through appropriate and accepted preservation programs.
  • Biological resources strategy: Promote a multi-species approach to habitat management programs, which can be used to mitigate expected impacts on biological resources of future development within the General Plan study area.
  • Biological resources strategy: Require biological assessments to be performed by a qualified biologist in areas where the existence of rare or endangered species is known or can be reasonably expected to exist. Require the implementation of recommendations included in biological reports as a condition of approval.
  • Biological resources strategy: Require all development, including roads, proposed adjacent to sensitive biological areas, blueline streams, and riparian and other biologically sensitive habitats, to provide adequate buffers and be set back a sufficient distance to eliminate significant impacts to such areas.
  • Biological resources strategy: Where preservation and conservation of biological resources depends upon mitigation measures adopted as conditions of approval, establish the following monitoring programs:
    1. 1) All discretionary approvals requiring mitigation measures for impacts to biological resources shall include the condition that the mitigation measures be monitored and modified, if necessary, unless a finding is made that such monitoring is not feasible;
    2. 2) The monitoring program shall be designed to determine if the mitigation measures were implemented and if they were successful;
    3. 3) The monitoring program shall be funded by the project applicant to ensure compliance with and effectiveness of conditions of approval;
    4. 4) Explore opportunities of land banking of both sensitive species and their habitats for use in future mitigation programs.

4. City of Lake Elsinore

The open space/conservation element of the City of Lake Elsinore General Plan encompasses eight sub-elements: biological resources; water resources; energy conservation; air resources; cultural resources; open space and visual resources; mineral resources; agricultural resources. The contents of the biological resources subelement form a basis for habitat conservation planning.

a. Open Space Element

The Open Space element identifies specific species and habitat of concern and related regulations adopted by the City.

  • Biological resources issue Certain plant and animal communities are restricted in distribution throughout the study area, and loss of these habitats through build out of the General Plan will be significant. These habitats include sage scrub and riparian woodland communities, least Bell's vireo, Stephens' kangaroo rat, and the slender-homed spineflower.
  • Biological resources regulations On the local level, efforts should be made to preserve important habitats and protect plant and animal species of concern. The City requires that all development proposals include adequate environmental documentation pursuant to CEQA and AB 3180 (Chapter 1232, State Statutes of 1989). Biological studies should provide adequate mitigation measures for identified significant biological impacts.
  • Biological resources procedures Permanent open space preserves may be designated as a condition of a project approval. Permanent open space preserves may be designed in future specific plan areas for the purpose of protecting identified sensitive biological resources. Moreover, a comprehensive approach should be taken to conserve continuous areas of open space, including open space linkages between projects, wildlife corridors and trails.

Such methods to evaluate and, where appropriate, acquire areas of high biological significance may include the acquisition of land by exaction, development agreement or gift; the dedication of conservation, open space and scenic easements; joint acquisition with local agencies; the transfer of development rights; lease-purchase agreements; and eminent domain.

5. City of Moreno Valley

The conservation element of the City of Moreno Valley General Plan sets forth an objective and supporting policies which provide a basis for habitat conservation within the City.

a. Conservation Element

The conservation element identifies a habitat conservation objective and includes four HCP-related policies:

  • Objective Maintain, protect, and preserve biologically significant habitats within the study area, including the San Jacinto Wildlife Preserve, riparian areas, habitats of rare and endangered species, and other areas of natural significance as part of the need for development of a balanced community.
  • Policy Require all development, including roads, proposed adjacent to riparian and other biologically sensitive habitats to provide adequate buffers and be set back a sufficient distance to eliminate significant impacts to such areas. C-8
  • Policy Require that development occurring adjacent to the San Jacinto Wildlife Preserve provide appropriate mitigation for potential impacts to the preserve. Potential measures include, but are not limited to:
    1. 1) Project design so as to minimize or eliminate the potential for unauthorized entry into the wildlife area;
    2. 2) The creation of buffer areas adjacent to the preserve, incorporating the most passive uses of the adjacent property;
    3. 3) Provide wildlife dispersion corridors linking the wildlife preserve to the Badlands area, including roadway crossings;
    4. 4) Provide wildlife movement linkages to water sources;
    5. 5) Protect the visual seclusion of large forage areas from road intrusion by vegetative buffering;
    6. 6) Provide vegetation that can be used by wildlife for cover along roadsides; and
    7. 7) Avoid intrusion of night lighting into the wildlife preserve.
  • Policy Require biological assessments to be performed by a qualified biologist in areas where the existence of rare or endangered species is known or can be reasonably expected to exist. Require the implementation of recommendations included in biological reports as a condition of approval.

6. City of Murrieta

The City of Murrieta General Plan adopted in June 1994 includes eight elements, including: land use; housing; circulation; conservation and open space; safety; noise; air quality and economic development. The conservation and open space element of the General Plan addresses habitat conservation through biotic resources goals and the discussion of related objectives and policies.

a. Conservation and Open Space Element

The Conservation and Open Space Element includes the following goal, objectives, and policies related to this HCP.

  • Goal Conserve biotic resources in both natural and urban environments.
  • Objective Biotic resources in the Plan Area, including vegetation, wildlife, and all special status species, shall be conserved through the protection of habitats and the mitigation of impacts due to development.
  • Policy Coordinate with regional, state, and federal agencies to achieve common goals for habitat and species conservation.
  • Policy Encourage donation or exchange of lands with sensitive biotic resources to non-profit environmental organizations or responsible agencies.
  • Policy Preserve opportunities for establishing waterways as wildlife corridors and encouraging flood control techniques which allow the establishment of habitats. Use other open space corridors or greenbelts to link natural areas where possible. Reestablish important wildlife corridors which may have been damaged.
  • Policy Ensure that all opportunities for the mitigation of environmental impacts are explored. Encourage the establishment of mitigation banks to protect or restore habitat within the Plan Area.
  • Policy In the review of development projects, assess the total habitat value of a site, rather than simply the presence or absence of special status species.
  • Policy Continue to implement regional habitat conservation programs for endangered species.
  • Policy Develop and create an endangered species habitat data bank.
  • Policy Development projects for major arterials and bridges in the City that would directly or indirectly impact biotic resources as a result of construction or post construction activities shall be designed to ensure that impacts to biotic resources are avoided or adequately mitigated. Consideration of the following issues shall be reflected in the design of such projects:
    1. 1) Potential for conflicts between active recreational use and areas of wildlife habitat.
    2. 2) The impacts of vehicular noise, light and glare on wildlife habitat.
    3. 3) Potential for surface water contamination of watercourses and riparian habitat.
    4. 4) Plant materials that compliment natural habitat areas and support wildlife.
    5. 5) Regional Plans and the need for wildlife corridors.
  • Policy Areas that contain significant natural habitat shall be included in the development and implementation of a wildlife and habitat management plan. The goal of the wildlife and habitat management plan will be to set forth specific development guidelines to ensure the preservation and survival of sensitive, unique, or locally limited flora and fauna that currently exist in the General Plan area. C-10
  • Policy Wildlife corridors within the General Plan area shall be established and preserved in perpetuity to permit free movement of resident and migratory wildlife and to integrate this free movement with the preservation of General Plan area wetland resources. Such corridors shall include the floodplain of Murrieta Creek, Warm Springs Creek, their associated tributaries and Cole Creek. Plans and projects proposed in sensitive areas shall preserve these major wildlife corridors and identify a"d preserve in perpetuity additional localized or project-specific wildlife movement corridors identified in the CEQA analysis required for such a project. Such localized corridors shall connect to the corridors associated with Murrieta Creek, Warm Springs Creek, and Cole Creek.
  • Policy All project proponents proposing development in SKR habitat areas shall participate in "Section 7" consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. If the City is a member of the HCA, the rules and procedures of the HCA shall apply. Both procedures could allow incidental take under Section 10(a) of the Endangered Species Act. Issuance of a 10(a) permit would enable the City to issue development permits resulting in the "incidental take" of SKR, where take is defined as any activity that would harm, kill, harass, or endanger SKR in the course of construction.
  • Policy The City of Murrieta shall pursue joining the Riverside County Habitat Conservation Agency.
  • Policy Areas dedicated as open space and other areas of natural habitat shall be protected from damage by off-road vehicles and other habitat-damaging disturbances such as camping, and unrestricted access by house pets. Areas shall be protected through fencing, signing and policing to indicate that such activities are prohibited.
  • Objective Land use and landscape strategies and standards which protect wildlife habitats and important vegetation.
  • Policy Require the use of sound conservation practices in the management of grading, drainage, protection of soils, protection of wildlife habitat areas, replacement of shrubs and ground covers, and the protection and replacement of indigenous trees.
  • Policy Provide natural areas in urban settings to increase species diversity and provide wildlife viewing opportunities for residents of the City.

7. City of Perris

The City of Perris General Plan adopted in 1991 incorporates seven elements: land use; housing; circulation; conservation/open space/recreation; public safety; noise; public facilities. Habitat conservation planning is addressed in the growth management subelement of the land use element and in the conservation and open space sub-elements of the conservation/open space/recreation element. C-11

a. Land Use Element

The Land Use element contains a growth management goal and three policies relevant to this HCP.

  • Growth management goal Manage growth and development to avoid adverse environmental and fiscal impacts.
  • Growth management policy Manage the outward expansion of all future development to maintain continuity with existing development, provide for orderly expansion of infrastructure and public services, minimize impacts on natural environmental resources and preserve designated or potential open space.
  • Growth management policy Manage growth within the planning area to minimize disruption to important environmental resource areas, such as biological habitat, historical and archeological sites, steep slopes, floodplains, geologically sensitive lands, mineral resources, agricultural preserves and water recharge areas.
  • Growth management policy Provide for the use of planned unit developments, which incorporate creative site design for new residential projects as a means of maintaining open space, reducing impacts to environmental resources and avoiding environmental constraints.
b. Conservation/Open Space/Recreation Element

This element includes a wildlife conservation goal, four related policies, and a sensitive habitats program. It also includes the following open space goals, policies, and strategies relevant to this HCP.

  • Conservation goal Conserve and protect natural plant and animal communities.
  • Conservation policy Conserve and protect important plant communities and wildlife habitats, such as riparian areas, wildlife movement corridors, wetlands, oak woodlands and other significant tree stands, and rare or endangered plant and animal species by using buffers, creative site planning, revegetation and open space easements and dedications.
  • Conservation policy Require development proposals in areas expected to contain important plant and animal communities to include biological assessments identifying species types and locations.
  • Conservation policy Allow new development to remove only the minimum natural vegetation and require revegetation of graded areas with native plant species consistent with public safety requirements.
  • Conservation policy Support programs to consolidate public lands as a means of preserving natural habitats.
  • Sensitive habitat program Grasslands within the Perris planning area support other animals considered sensitive such as the Ferruginous hawk and other raptors. The most sensitive of these species is the Stephens' kangaroo rat, which is designated as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The City of Perris is participating in a joint powers agreement between surrounding cities in Riverside County and the County of Riverside to acquire habitat lands for the kangaroo rat as part of the RCHCA Habitat Conservation Plan. Three Study Areas (Steele Peak, Motte Reserve and Kabian Park) have been identified in the Perris planning area for potential permanent reserves. Mitigation fees are also collected by the cities participating within the joint powers agreement to acquire lands within these future reserve areas.
  • Open space goal Protect open space areas to preserve natural resources.
  • Open space policy Encourage in-fill and contiguous development to preserve outlying open space areas.
  • Open space policy Designate and acquire important open space lands such as endangered plant and animal species habitats, and land containing unique geologic features, through dedication or other means of acquisition.
  • Open space action strategy Jointly acquire environmentally sensitive lands through a joint powers agreement with other cities or the County.
  • Open space action strategy Using the City's development review process, development proposals within natural resource areas identified in the Conservation/Open Space/Recreation Element will be assessed in terms of impacts to the following characteristics where they exist on or near the proposed development site: riparian corridors; sensitive biological habitat; naturally steep slopes (over 30 percent grade); ground and surface water resources; rock outcroppings; state recognized mineral resource zones; and prime agricultural soils.

8. City of Riverside

Elements of the 1993 General Plan for the City of Riverside include: conservation; open space; community character; land use; public safety; transportation; noise; housing. The conservation element addresses habitat conservation through its natural resource goals and policies. In addition, the plan implementation section specifies recommendations for furthering natural resource protection and environmental review.

a. Conservation Element

The conservation element contains a natural resource protection goal, eight policies, and implementation recommendations which support this HCP:

  • Natural resource goal To protect the biotic communities and critical habitats for endangered species throughout the General Plan Area.
  • Natural resource policy The City should design its plans, policies, and implementation techniques to protect key wildlife habitats, habitats of rare, threatened, or endangered species, wetlands and other significant environmentally sensitive areas.
  • Natural resource policy The City shall use the generalized locations of rare and endangered species habitat, identified in the Plan on the date of Plan adoption, to identify areas for which more specific analysis will be necessary as part of the development review process. The City shall update as more detailed habitat information is developed. The City may require habitat analysis for proposed developments in areas of potential habitat for other species listed in the Plan, even though such habitat is not mapped. Site specific review may be required because the habitats for these unmapped, sensitive species range from pristine to disturbed areas.
  • Natural resource policy The City shall consider requiring development projects in areas identified in the Plan to undergo review to assess their impact on habitats of rare, threatened or endangered species. This review of habitat impacts should be conducted as part of the project's environmental review. Developers of projects found to have potential impacts on sensitive species may be required to mitigate the impacts of proposed habitat changes.
  • Natural resource policy The City shall cooperate with the County, State and Federal governments to protect the Stephens' kangaroo rat (SKR) by complying with the terms of the adopted Short-Term SKR Habitat Conservation Plan, including provisions for development regulations, mitigation fees, and the acquisition and operation of Sycamore Canyon as part of the park.
  • Natural resource policy The City should participate with the County, State and Federal governments in developing and implementing both a long-term Habitat Conservation Plan for the Stephens' kangaroo rat and a county-wide multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan.
  • Natural resource policy The City shall endeavor to protect native plant communities in the General Plan Area, including the inland sage scrub, riparian and vernal pool habitats.
  • Natural resource policy The City should protect and enhance known wildlife migratory corridors and help create new corridors whenever possible.
  • Natural resource policy The City should establish programs to identify, map and monitor the habitat for sensitive species listed in the Plan, or for other species added to the State or Federal listings of rare, threatened or endangered species.
  • Natural resource implementation recommendation Require developments that include property identified as potential habitat for the rare or endangered species listed in the Plan to submit site specific analysis for the effect of the proposed development on the affected rare or endangered species and to propose strategies for minimizing those effects.
  • Natural resourceimplementation recommendation Continue active participation in Federal, State and local efforts to preserve rare, threatened and endangered species in the General Plan Area.
  • Natural resource implementation recommendation Require site specific biological assessment and appropriate mitigation measures for all developments of property containing native plant communities and other potential habitats for sensitive species listed in the Plan.
  • Natural resource implementation recommendation Implement a program of research and field work to identify and map areas of habitat for sensitive species. Revise the Plan to reflect the results of this analysis. Periodically review and update this habitat information.
  • Environmental review implementation recommendation Continue to use mitigation monitoring for EIR's and mitigated negative declarations in order to ensure compliance and completion of mitigation measures required of development and other projects.
  • Environmental review implementation recommendation Continue to participate in regional and subregional environmental planning programs including, but not limited to, the development of coordinated air quality plans, habitat conservation plans and congestion management plans.

9. City of Temecula

The City of Temecula General Plan adopted in 1993 includes ten elements: land use; circulation; housing; open space and conservation; growth management/public facilities; public safety; noise; air quality; community design and economic development. Habitat conservation is addressed in the goals, policies and implementing programs of two elements: land use and open space and conservation.

a. Land Use Element

The element includes the following goal, policies, and implementation programs supportive of this HCP:

  • Land use goal A development pattern that preserves and enhances the environmental resources of the study area.
  • Land use policy Cooperate with other agencies to develop Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plans in western Riverside and northern San Diego Counties.
  • Land use policy Work with the utility districts to develop a trail system and enhance the natural resources along the San Diego Aqueduct, creeks, and other utility easements where feasible.
  • Land use policy Conserve the resources of Pechanga, Temecula and Murrieta Creeks through appropriate densities of development, setbacks, landscaping, and site design of surrounding projects.
  • Land use implementation program Design and development of flood control improvements, habitat conservation, and recreation uses along Murrieta Creek, Temecula Creek, and other waterways.
  • Land use implementation program Preservation of significant biological resources in cooperation with the California Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
b. Open Space and Conservation Element

This element contains the following goal, policies, and implementation programs relevant to this HCP:

  • Open Space/Conservation goal Conservation of important biological habitats arid protection of plant and animal species of concern, wildlife movement corridors, and general biodiversity.
  • Open Space/Conservation goal Require development proposals to identify significant biological resources and provide mitigation including the use of adequate buffering; selective preservation; the provision of replacement habitats; the use of sensitive site planning techniques including wildlife corridor/recreational trails; and other appropriate measures.
  • Open Space/Conservation policy Work with State, regional and non-profit agencies and organizations to preserve and enhance significant biological resources on publicly owned lands.
  • Open Space/Conservation policy Coordinate with the County of Riverside and other relevant agencies in the adoption and implementation of the Riverside County Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan.
  • Open Space/Conservation policy Maintain an inventory of existing natural resources in the City through periodic updates of the Master Environmental Assessment.
  • Open Space/Conservation policy Limit the recreational use of designated open space areas where sensitive biological resources are present.
  • Open Space/Conservation policy Maintain and enhance the resources of the Temecula Creek, Santa Margarita River, Pechanga Creek, and other waterways to ensure the long-term viability of the habitat, wildlife, and wildlife movement corridors.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Require development proposals in areas expected to contain important plant communities and wildlife habitat to provide detailed biological assessments, assess potential impacts, and to mitigate significant impacts.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Require the establishment of open space areas that contain significant water courses, wildlife corridors, and habitats for rare or endangered plant and animal species.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Require appropriate resource protection measures to be prepared in conjunction with specific plans and subsequent development proposals. Such requirements may include the preparation of a Vegetation Management Program that addresses landscape maintenance, fuel modification zones, management of passive open space areas, provision of corridor connections for wildlife movement, conservation of water courses and rehabilitation of biological resources displaced in the development process.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Develop Open Space zoning classifications that effectively regulate the types of uses and activities allowed in open space areas to minimize the impacts of grading and development in open space areas.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Require new developments to be monitored in compliance with AB 3180 ("Mitigation Monitoring Program") and report to the City on the completion of mitigation and resource protection measures required for each project.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Evaluate and pursue the acquisition of areas of high biological resource significance. Such acquisition mechanisms may include: acquiring land by development agreement of gift; the dedication of conservation, open space and scenic easements; joint acquisition with local agencies; the transfer of development rights; lease purchase agreements; state and federal grants; and impact fees.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Utilize the resources of national, regional and local conservation organizations, corporations, associations and benevolent entities to identify and acquire environmentally sensitive lands and to protect water courses and wildlife corridors.
  • Open Space/Conservation implementation program Continue participation in multi-species habitat conservation planning, watershed management planning and water resource management planning efforts.
  • Open space-Related plan The Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) for the Stephens' kangaroo rat, implemented in 1989, identifies ecological and land use characteristics of the historic range of the species. The HCP also provides a program to acquire permanent reserves for the species, using development fees to purchase land within the designated reserve areas. The Temecula General Plan Study Area is included within the HCP fee area; currently no reserve areas are designated within the General Plan study area.

C. References

  • City of Corona General Plan (1992) *
  • City of Hemet General Plan (1992)
  • City of Lake Elsinore General Plan (no date)
  • City of Moreno Valley General Plan (no date)
  • City of Murrieta General Plan (1994)
  • City of Perris General Plan (1991)
  • City of Riverside General Plan 2010 (1993) **
  • City of Temecula General Plan (1993) **
  • County of Riverside Comprehensive General Plan (1992)*
  • Lake Mathews Community Plan (1987)
  • Lakeview/Nuevo Community Plan (1990)
  • Southwest Area Community Plan (1989)

* Date of most recent plan amendment or addendum

** Draft planter review; not adopted

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